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Tag Archives: Landmark

The Gripsholm Castle at Midnight

I’m overwhelmed by the response on my last upload, picturing The Stockholm Town hall. It’s a picture that’s been on my list of captures I wanted to make for a long time. Last summer the conditions where perfect so I was lucky to pull it off. I’m very proud of that HDR and consider it to be one of my best. Here is another one that I had on my list for a long time, The Gripsholm Castle at night. This reflection requires perfect wind still and one night in July last year it happened and I jumped into my car and drove to Mariefred and found this magnificent view. The 5 exposures are captured around midnight. The longest exposure (+4) is 16 minutes so the mosquitoes where quite happy to feast on me while I was waiting. But the ducks where quite unhappy with me because I occupied the pier there they had their night rest. They where angrily swimming around in the foreground but because of the longtime exposures they did not spoil my HDR.

The Gripsholm Castle captured around midnight on perfect wind still night in July 2011. This HDR has been on my list of pictures I wanted to capture for a long time. Last summer I eventually found the right conditions to make it happen.

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Posted by on December 18, 2011 in Mariefred, Photo

 

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The Russian Orthodox Cathedral in Peterhof

One more interesting building to visit when you’re in Peterhof is the Russian Orthodox cathedral of saints Peter and Paul. The Cathedral is located just across the main street from the Upper Gardens of the Grand Palace. This Cathedral is built in a more traditional russian architecture style than most cathedrals and churches in Saint Petersburg. It has a pyramidal shape crowned with five tented heads. Unfortunately you’re not allowed to take photos inside russian orthodox churches. But this one is richly and very beautifully decorated inside. If you take a marshutka from Baltisky Railwaystation in Saint Petersburg you can jump of at the bus stop just beside the cathedral. Very cheep, cost only 50 rubles (1,2 €). If you’re not comfortable with the public transport in Russia, you can always buy an excursion. There are lots of companies offering a broad variety of excursions.

The Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul (Собор Петра и Павла) a Russian Orthodox cathedral in Peterhof, 25 km east of Saint Petersburg, Russia.The construction of the cathedral begun in 1894 and was completed in 1904. On the 12th of June 1905 the cathedral was consecrated in the presence of the Tsar family. The side chapels of Saint Alexander Nevsky and Saint Xenia were consecrated on the 28th of August the same year.The Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul is built in the spirit of 16th and 17th century Russian architecture. Exteriorly it has a pyramidal shape crowned with five tented heads. The height of the cathedral is about 70 meter.

 
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Posted by on May 20, 2011 in Peterhof, Photo, Saint Petersburg

 

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The Upper Gardens

The Upper Gardens are maybe not as attractive as the Lower Gardens. But they have one advantage, they are free to visit. The more spectacular Lower Gardens have admission. The centrepiece of the Upper Gardens are the Neptune Fountain after the Roman god of the sea. There are some beautiful statues too, I belive that they also are taken out of the Greek/Roman mythology.

The Nepune Fountain which is the largest fountain in the upper gardens at Peterhof Grand Palace near Saint Petersburg, Russia.

A sculpture in the upper gardens at the Grand Palace in Peterhof near Saint Petersburg, Russia.

 
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Posted by on May 19, 2011 in Peterhof, Photo, Saint Petersburg

 

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Fountains

The most striking features of the Peterhof Grand Palace are its 176 fountains. But unlike the fountains of its role model, Versailles, these fountains works every day from early may to early october. I’ve visited Versailles twice but never saw the fountains in work there. if I remember it correctly they only work in special shows one a week during summer.

Most of the fountains are situated in the lower gardens and the most well-known are the Grand Cascade and the Samson Fountain. The Grand Cascade consists of 64 fountains and 37 gilded sculptures. The Samson Fountain depicts the moment when Samson tears open the jaws of a lion, representing Russia’s victory over Sweden in the Great Northern War. From the lion’s mouth shoots a 20 metre high vertical jet of water, the highest in all of Peterhof.

The Grand Cascade

The fountain group called the Grand Cascade at Peterhof Grand Palace, 25 km east of Saint Petersburg, Russia.The Grand Palace at Peterhof was designed to be the centerpiece of Peter the Great's Russian Versaille.

The Samson Fountain and the Grand Cascade

The Samson Fountain (Фонтан Самсон) and the Grand Cascade (Большой каскад) in the Lower Gardens at Peterhof Grand Palace, 25 km east of Saint Petersburg, Russia.The Samson Fountain depicts the moment when Samson tears open the jaws of a lion, representing Russia's victory over Sweden in the Great Northern War, and is doubly symbolic. The lion is an element of the Swedish coat of arms, and one of the great victories of the war was won on St Samson's Day. From the lion's mouth shoots a 20-metre-high vertical jet of water, the highest in all of Peterhof. This masterpiece by Mikhail Kozlovsky was looted by the invading Germans during the Second World War. A replica of the statue was installed in 1947.

 
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Posted by on May 18, 2011 in History, Peterhof, Photo, Saint Petersburg

 

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Peterhof Grand Palace

If we’re talking about palaces in Saint Petersburg and it’s surroundings, then we have to include the Grand palace at Peterhof. Peterhof which is German for Peter’s Court is situated on the southern shore of the Gulf of Finland, about 45 minutes by bus or train from Baltisky Vokzal in Saint Petersburg. Peter the Great’s desire was to build an imperial palace in the suburbs of his new city. The inspiration was Versailles and the palace and it’s gardens are often referred to as the Russian Versailles. However this grandiose project where not compleated under Peter’s lifetime. It was under his daughter, Elizabeth’s regime that the Grand Palace with its famous gardens and fountains were compleated. Guess who which architect was hired for this project. No surprise it was Tsaritsa Elizabeth’s favourite, Bartolomeo Rastrelli.

The Palace, at Peterhof, itself is not as impressive as the Winter Palace or the Grand Catherine Palace. But the two pavilions at each wing of the palace are very eye-catching with their golden cupolas. This is the Church pavilion with 5 gilded cupolas viewed from the lower gardens.

The church pavilion (viewed from the lower gardens) of the Grand Palace in Peterhof, 25 km east of Saint Petersburg, Russia.

 
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Posted by on May 17, 2011 in History, Peterhof, Photo, Saint Petersburg

 

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The Hermitage Pavilion

One of the most picturesque buildings in the gardens at the Catherine Palace is the Hermitage Pavilion. It was built at the same time as the palace and is beautifully situated in a forest clearing. The Hermitage Pavilion proved to be a favourite place for the Tsaritsa Elizabeth and her guests. She particularly liked to show it off to foreign ambassadors and other dignitaries.

The central hall of the Hermitage was the object of particular fascination for visitors. It contained a table large enough to seat up to 35 guests. What was unique about the dining room table was that it was equipped with special mechanisms allowing the guests to dine without the presence of servants. In the lower basement, the servants would prepare the table, hoist it to the floor above where waiting guests would sit down to dinner. A diner only needed only to write the name of the dish he desired on a slate and pull the bell next to it. A short time later the chosen dish would appear at the table. Once the meal was over, the table was lowered into the floor, the chairs removed, and the dining room opened into a ballroom.

As you can see in the HDR-picture, craftsmen are laying their final hand on an ongoing renovation. Next day the Hermitage Pavilion was reopened for the public after this renovation.

This is the Hermitage Pavilion (Павильон Эрмитаж) in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia. The pavilion is located in the Gardens at the Catherine Palace. The Hermitage Pavilion was built between 1748 to 1756 by the architect Bartolomeo Rastrelli, under the regime of Empress Elizabeth, the daughter of Peter the Great.  The Hermitage Pavilion proved to be a favourite place for the Empress and her guests. She particularly liked to show it off to foreign ambassadors and other dignitaries.The central hall of the Hermitage was the object of particular fascination for visitors. It contained a table large enough to seat up to 35 guests. What was unique about the dining room table was that it was equipped with special mechanisms allowing the guests to dine without the presence of servants. In the lower basement, the servants would prepare the table, hoist it to the floor above where waiting guests would sit down to dinner. A diner only needed only to write the name of the dish he desired on a slate and pull the bell next to it. A short time later the chosen dish would appear at the table. Once the meal was over, the table was lowered into the floor, the chairs removed, and the dining room opened into a ballroom. Rastrelli was a technical marvel for his time.

 
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Posted by on May 14, 2011 in History, Photo, Pushkin, Saint Petersburg

 

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The Grand Catherine Palace

About 30 minutes, by bus, south of Saint Petersburg lies Pushkin. This city is named after the Russian poet Alexander Pushkin. Before 1937 the city was named Tsarskoye Selo which literary means “The Tsar’s Village”. Here you can visit another architectural masterpiece of Bartolomeo Rastrelli, the Grand Catherine Palace. The palace was originally commissioned by Peter the Great and named after his second wife Catherine. This palace was far more modest than the one standing there now. When Peter’s and Catherine’s daughter Elizabeth become Tsaritsa, she commissioned a new palace to replace to old one, a palace on the scale to rival Versailles. Of course, she hired her favourite architect, Bartolomeo Rastrelli, for this job. The new palace was presented to the Tsaritsa in 1756. It’s 325 meter long and nearly 1 km in circumference, with elaborately decorated blue and white facades featuring gilded atlantes, caryatids and pilasters.

If you’re in Saint Petersburg and have a day over I really recomend a daytrip to Pushkin and the Grand Catherine Palace. You can reach Puskin by train from Vitebsk vokzal (station) or by marshrutka (minibus) from Moskovskaya ploshchad (square).

A couple of HDR-pictures I captured of the Grand Catherine Palace.

This is the Grand Catherine Palace (Большой Екатерининский Дворец)  viewed from the Catherine Park towards the church wing. The palace is located in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia.The palace is named after Catherine I, the wife of Peter the Great, who ruled Russia for two years after her husband's death. Originally a modest two storey building commissioned by Peter for Catherine in 1717, the palace owes its awesome grandeur to their daughter, Empress Elizabeth, who chose Tsarskoe Selo as her chief summer residence. Starting in 1743, the building was reconstructed by four different architects, before Bartholomeo Rastrelli, Chief Architect of the Imperial Court, was instructed to completely redesign the building on a scale to rival Versailles.The brand new palace was presented to the Empress in 1756. It is 325 meter long and nearly 1 km in circumference, with elaborately decorated blue and white facades featuring gilded atlantes, caryatids and pilasters designed by German sculptor Johann Franz Dunker, who also worked with Rastrelli on the palace's original interiors. In Elizabeth's reign it took over 100kg of gold to decorate the palace exteriors, an excess that was deplored by Catherine the Great when she discovered the state and private funds that had been lavished on the building.

A closer view of Catherine Palace (Большой Екатерининский Дворец) in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia.The palace is named after Catherine I, the wife of Peter the Great, who ruled Russia for two years after her husband's death. Originally a modest two storey building commissioned by Peter for Catherine in 1717, the palace owes its awesome grandeur to their daughter, Empress Elizabeth, who chose Tsarskoe Selo as her chief summer residence. Starting in 1743, the building was reconstructed by four different architects, before Bartholomeo Rastrelli, Chief Architect of the Imperial Court, was instructed to completely redesign the building on a scale to rival Versailles.The brand new palace was presented to the Empress in 1756. It is 325 meter long and nearly 1 km in circumference, with elaborately decorated blue and white facades featuring gilded atlantes, caryatids and pilasters designed by German sculptor Johann Franz Dunker, who also worked with Rastrelli on the palace's original interiors. In Elizabeth's reign it took over 100kg of gold to decorate the palace exteriors, an excess that was deplored by Catherine the Great when she discovered the state and private funds that had been lavished on the building.

A closer view of Catherine Palace (Большой Екатерининский Дворец) in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia.The palace is named after Catherine I, the wife of Peter the Great, who ruled Russia for two years after her husband's death. Originally a modest two storey building commissioned by Peter for Catherine in 1717, the palace owes its awesome grandeur to their daughter, Empress Elizabeth, who chose Tsarskoe Selo as her chief summer residence. Starting in 1743, the building was reconstructed by four different architects, before Bartholomeo Rastrelli, Chief Architect of the Imperial Court, was instructed to completely redesign the building on a scale to rival Versailles.The brand new palace was presented to the Empress in 1756. It is 325 meter long and nearly 1 km in circumference, with elaborately decorated blue and white facades featuring gilded atlantes, caryatids and pilasters designed by German sculptor Johann Franz Dunker, who also worked with Rastrelli on the palace's original interiors. In Elizabeth's reign it took over 100kg of gold to decorate the palace exteriors, an excess that was deplored by Catherine the Great when she discovered the state and private funds that had been lavished on the building.

 
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Posted by on May 13, 2011 in History, Photo, Pushkin, Saint Petersburg

 

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