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Tag Archives: Catherine

The new altar set in the Church of Catherine

A last look in the Church of Catherine before we walk on the neighbouring parish Sofia and its magnificent church in Neo-Romanesque style at Vita Bergen. The old altar set was destroyed in the fire 1990. This new one is designed by the sculptor Liss Eriksson and the textile artist Kajsa Melanton and is named “Närvaro genom frånvaro”, Presence by absence. It presents a Calvary scene which contains the cross, the shroud and the crown of thorns. I usually don’t like modern church decorations but the interior of the Church of Catherine is IMO very beautiful!

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Posted by on July 24, 2011 in Church, Photo, Stockholm

 

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The new organ in the Curch of Catherine

The present organ is the Church of Catherine´s third. Its predecessor, manufactured at Åkerman & Lund Orgelbyggeri AB in 1863, was destroyed in the fire 1990. 1993 a new organ was ordered from J. L. van den Heuvel Orgelbouw in Holland. Seven years later this organ, with 62 organ stops, were installed on the rebuilt organ loft. The Gren & Stråhles designed facade of the original organ loft was restored after the fire however it was slightly simplified from its original look.

The new organ from J. L. van den Heuvel Orgelbouw in the Church of Catherine at Södermalm, Stockholm, Sweden.

 
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Posted by on July 23, 2011 in Church, Photo, Stockholm

 

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The Church of Catherine

Today’s HDR is an autumn capture of the Church of Catherine taken from the cemetary where several famous Swedes are buried, e.g. the assassinated Foreign Minister Anna Lindh and the popular Dutch-Swedish singer Cornelis Vreeswijk. Below the picture you can read a short summary of the church’s history.

A autumn capture of the Church of Catherine (Katarina kyrka) at Södermalm in Stockholm, Sweden.

In 1954 King Charles X Gustav granted a request from the growing population in Södermalm to found a new parish in the eastern part. The building of the new church, which is named after his mother the Princess Catherine, started in 1656. Charles X wild plans of relocating the Royal Castle from the Old Town to Södermalm needed a first class church there. For this project the most capable Swedish architect of that time, Jean de la Vallée, where hired. But the construction went on slowly due to lack of funds and it was not until 1695 before the church were completed. The Church of Catherine was built as a central church in the shape of a Greek cross which was the first of its kind in Sweden.

On the first of May 1723 the Church of Catherine was badly damaged in “Katarinabranden” a large fire at Södermalm which also destroyed about 500 houses. However the rebuilding of the church started almost immediately and was supervised by the city architect Göran Josua Adelcrantz. The new tower was larger was larger than the previous one and had an octagonal shape.

Since the Church of Catherine was built on the hill where the bodies from the Stockholm Bloodbath were burned it was said that she had a curse over her. Two times should her church tower collapse. This prophecy was fulfilled on the night of 17th of May 1990 when the church once again was badly damaged by a fire. Immediately the foundation “Rädda Katarina”, Save Catherine, was started and collected money to rebuild the church. The rebuilding, supervised by the architect Ove Hidemark, was made using only original building materials and in 1995 the Church of Catherine was again inaugurated.

 
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Posted by on July 22, 2011 in Church, History, Photo, Stockholm

 

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The Hermitage Pavilion

One of the most picturesque buildings in the gardens at the Catherine Palace is the Hermitage Pavilion. It was built at the same time as the palace and is beautifully situated in a forest clearing. The Hermitage Pavilion proved to be a favourite place for the Tsaritsa Elizabeth and her guests. She particularly liked to show it off to foreign ambassadors and other dignitaries.

The central hall of the Hermitage was the object of particular fascination for visitors. It contained a table large enough to seat up to 35 guests. What was unique about the dining room table was that it was equipped with special mechanisms allowing the guests to dine without the presence of servants. In the lower basement, the servants would prepare the table, hoist it to the floor above where waiting guests would sit down to dinner. A diner only needed only to write the name of the dish he desired on a slate and pull the bell next to it. A short time later the chosen dish would appear at the table. Once the meal was over, the table was lowered into the floor, the chairs removed, and the dining room opened into a ballroom.

As you can see in the HDR-picture, craftsmen are laying their final hand on an ongoing renovation. Next day the Hermitage Pavilion was reopened for the public after this renovation.

This is the Hermitage Pavilion (Павильон Эрмитаж) in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia. The pavilion is located in the Gardens at the Catherine Palace. The Hermitage Pavilion was built between 1748 to 1756 by the architect Bartolomeo Rastrelli, under the regime of Empress Elizabeth, the daughter of Peter the Great.  The Hermitage Pavilion proved to be a favourite place for the Empress and her guests. She particularly liked to show it off to foreign ambassadors and other dignitaries.The central hall of the Hermitage was the object of particular fascination for visitors. It contained a table large enough to seat up to 35 guests. What was unique about the dining room table was that it was equipped with special mechanisms allowing the guests to dine without the presence of servants. In the lower basement, the servants would prepare the table, hoist it to the floor above where waiting guests would sit down to dinner. A diner only needed only to write the name of the dish he desired on a slate and pull the bell next to it. A short time later the chosen dish would appear at the table. Once the meal was over, the table was lowered into the floor, the chairs removed, and the dining room opened into a ballroom. Rastrelli was a technical marvel for his time.

 
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Posted by on May 14, 2011 in History, Photo, Pushkin, Saint Petersburg

 

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The Grand Catherine Palace

About 30 minutes, by bus, south of Saint Petersburg lies Pushkin. This city is named after the Russian poet Alexander Pushkin. Before 1937 the city was named Tsarskoye Selo which literary means “The Tsar’s Village”. Here you can visit another architectural masterpiece of Bartolomeo Rastrelli, the Grand Catherine Palace. The palace was originally commissioned by Peter the Great and named after his second wife Catherine. This palace was far more modest than the one standing there now. When Peter’s and Catherine’s daughter Elizabeth become Tsaritsa, she commissioned a new palace to replace to old one, a palace on the scale to rival Versailles. Of course, she hired her favourite architect, Bartolomeo Rastrelli, for this job. The new palace was presented to the Tsaritsa in 1756. It’s 325 meter long and nearly 1 km in circumference, with elaborately decorated blue and white facades featuring gilded atlantes, caryatids and pilasters.

If you’re in Saint Petersburg and have a day over I really recomend a daytrip to Pushkin and the Grand Catherine Palace. You can reach Puskin by train from Vitebsk vokzal (station) or by marshrutka (minibus) from Moskovskaya ploshchad (square).

A couple of HDR-pictures I captured of the Grand Catherine Palace.

This is the Grand Catherine Palace (Большой Екатерининский Дворец)  viewed from the Catherine Park towards the church wing. The palace is located in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia.The palace is named after Catherine I, the wife of Peter the Great, who ruled Russia for two years after her husband's death. Originally a modest two storey building commissioned by Peter for Catherine in 1717, the palace owes its awesome grandeur to their daughter, Empress Elizabeth, who chose Tsarskoe Selo as her chief summer residence. Starting in 1743, the building was reconstructed by four different architects, before Bartholomeo Rastrelli, Chief Architect of the Imperial Court, was instructed to completely redesign the building on a scale to rival Versailles.The brand new palace was presented to the Empress in 1756. It is 325 meter long and nearly 1 km in circumference, with elaborately decorated blue and white facades featuring gilded atlantes, caryatids and pilasters designed by German sculptor Johann Franz Dunker, who also worked with Rastrelli on the palace's original interiors. In Elizabeth's reign it took over 100kg of gold to decorate the palace exteriors, an excess that was deplored by Catherine the Great when she discovered the state and private funds that had been lavished on the building.

A closer view of Catherine Palace (Большой Екатерининский Дворец) in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia.The palace is named after Catherine I, the wife of Peter the Great, who ruled Russia for two years after her husband's death. Originally a modest two storey building commissioned by Peter for Catherine in 1717, the palace owes its awesome grandeur to their daughter, Empress Elizabeth, who chose Tsarskoe Selo as her chief summer residence. Starting in 1743, the building was reconstructed by four different architects, before Bartholomeo Rastrelli, Chief Architect of the Imperial Court, was instructed to completely redesign the building on a scale to rival Versailles.The brand new palace was presented to the Empress in 1756. It is 325 meter long and nearly 1 km in circumference, with elaborately decorated blue and white facades featuring gilded atlantes, caryatids and pilasters designed by German sculptor Johann Franz Dunker, who also worked with Rastrelli on the palace's original interiors. In Elizabeth's reign it took over 100kg of gold to decorate the palace exteriors, an excess that was deplored by Catherine the Great when she discovered the state and private funds that had been lavished on the building.

A closer view of Catherine Palace (Большой Екатерининский Дворец) in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia.The palace is named after Catherine I, the wife of Peter the Great, who ruled Russia for two years after her husband's death. Originally a modest two storey building commissioned by Peter for Catherine in 1717, the palace owes its awesome grandeur to their daughter, Empress Elizabeth, who chose Tsarskoe Selo as her chief summer residence. Starting in 1743, the building was reconstructed by four different architects, before Bartholomeo Rastrelli, Chief Architect of the Imperial Court, was instructed to completely redesign the building on a scale to rival Versailles.The brand new palace was presented to the Empress in 1756. It is 325 meter long and nearly 1 km in circumference, with elaborately decorated blue and white facades featuring gilded atlantes, caryatids and pilasters designed by German sculptor Johann Franz Dunker, who also worked with Rastrelli on the palace's original interiors. In Elizabeth's reign it took over 100kg of gold to decorate the palace exteriors, an excess that was deplored by Catherine the Great when she discovered the state and private funds that had been lavished on the building.

 
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Posted by on May 13, 2011 in History, Photo, Pushkin, Saint Petersburg

 

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