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Category Archives: Pushkin

Fedorovsky town

I love to photo ruins. They are usually a perfect subject for HDR. A short walk from the Catherine Palace past the Alexander Palace lies Fedorovsky godorok or the Fedorovsky town as you would say in English. Originally this complex of buildings were built as living quarters for the clergy of the Fedorovsky Cathedral that lies just across the nearby pond. There was also a museum of old Russian art and architecture inside the walls of the complex. During the First World War there where a hospital for wounded soldiers and officers here under the patronage of the Tsar Nicholas II’s youngest daughters, Grand Duchess Maria and Anastasia.

The complex suffered severe damage during the German occupation in the Second World War and it was not until the Russian Orthodox Church took over the town in 1994 that a much-needed restoration begun. The restoration is still ongoing but inside the walls there are now the residence of the Patriarch, a museum of history of the Russian Orthodox Church, a pilgrimage and training centre, icon-painting workshops, and a hotel.

On the first HDR-picture you can see the Vicarage that’s still not restored.

A view of the Vicarage at the Fedorovsky godorok (Fedorovsky town).Fedorovsky godorok (Фёдоровский городок) is a complex of buildings in the town of Pushkin, near Saint Petersburg, Russia. Earlier this town was called Tsarskoye Selo, literally ”The Tsar’s Village”.  The town’s name was changed in 1937 to Pushkin to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the death of the Russian poet Alexander Pushkin.At the time of the construction of the Fedorovsky Cathedral it was necessary to build living quarters for the clergy of the cathedral. So it was decided to build an architectural complex in national style on the opposite side of the pond from the cathedral. The Tsar Nicholas II put forward two conditions for this complex to the chosen architect, Stepan Krichinsky . The buildings should be in the same style as the Rostov Kremlin and the complex should not be radically discordant from the nearby Alexander Palace. The construction of the complex started in the summer of 1913 and continued until June 1918.During the construction of the Fedorovsky town, it was suggested by members of the “Society for Renaissance Art of Russia” to open the Museum of Old Russian Art and Architecture here. A large and unique collections of ancient ornaments, weapons, icons, and church plates from the 16th and 17th centuries where quickly gathered here.During the First World War, a hospital for wounded soldiers and officers where opened in the Fedorovsky town and cathedral. The Tsar Nicholas II’s two youngest daughters, Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna, and Anastasia Nikolaevna, become the patronages of the hospital.During the German occupation under the Second World War the Federovsky town was badly damaged. After the war it was suggested to restore the complex, however, it was not carried out. Restoration only began in 1976.In 1994, the complex of the Fedorovsky town was handed over to the Russian Orthodox Church. With the blessing of Patriarch Alexy II there been created inside the walls, the residence of the Patriarch, a museum of history of the Russian Orthodox Church, a pilgrimage and training centre, icon-painting workshops, and a hotel.

On the second HDR-picture you can see the walls and the beautiful White Stone Gate.

A view of a Tower and the White Stonegate of the Fedorovsky godorok (Fedorovsky town).Fedorovsky godorok (Фёдоровский городок) is a complex of buildings in the town of Pushkin, near Saint Petersburg, Russia. Earlier this town was called Tsarskoye Selo, literally ”The Tsar’s Village”.  The town’s name was changed in 1937 to Pushkin to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the death of the Russian poet Alexander Pushkin.At the time of the construction of the Fedorovsky Cathedral it was necessary to build living quarters for the clergy of the cathedral. So it was decided to build an architectural complex in national style on the opposite side of the pond from the cathedral. The Tsar Nicholas II put forward two conditions for this complex to the chosen architect, Stepan Krichinsky . The buildings should be in the same style as the Rostov Kremlin and the complex should not be radically discordant from the nearby Alexander Palace. The construction of the complex started in the summer of 1913 and continued until June 1918.During the construction of the Fedorovsky town, it was suggested by members of the “Society for Renaissance Art of Russia” to open the Museum of Old Russian Art and Architecture here. A large and unique collections of ancient ornaments, weapons, icons, and church plates from the 16th and 17th centuries where quickly gathered here.During the First World War, a hospital for wounded soldiers and officers where opened in the Fedorovsky town and cathedral. The Tsar Nicholas II’s two youngest daughters, Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna, and Anastasia Nikolaevna, become the patronages of the hospital.During the German occupation under the Second World War the Federovsky town was badly damaged. After the war it was suggested to restore the complex, however, it was not carried out. Restoration only began in 1976.In 1994, the complex of the Fedorovsky town was handed over to the Russian Orthodox Church. With the blessing of Patriarch Alexy II there been created inside the walls, the residence of the Patriarch, a museum of history of the Russian Orthodox Church, a pilgrimage and training centre, icon-painting workshops, and a hotel.

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Posted by on May 15, 2011 in History, Photo, Pushkin, Saint Petersburg

 

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How about a game of Battleship?

Actually I don’t know anything about this Navy Monument in the gardens at the Catherine Palace. But I think it’s quite cool! If anybody knows something about it, I would be happy if you share this knowledge with me!

Have a nice Saturday evening!

An unique monument of old ships in the Catherine Park at Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia. The Catherine Park is adjacent to the Catherine Palace.

 
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Posted by on May 14, 2011 in Photo, Pushkin, Saint Petersburg

 

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The Hermitage Pavilion

One of the most picturesque buildings in the gardens at the Catherine Palace is the Hermitage Pavilion. It was built at the same time as the palace and is beautifully situated in a forest clearing. The Hermitage Pavilion proved to be a favourite place for the Tsaritsa Elizabeth and her guests. She particularly liked to show it off to foreign ambassadors and other dignitaries.

The central hall of the Hermitage was the object of particular fascination for visitors. It contained a table large enough to seat up to 35 guests. What was unique about the dining room table was that it was equipped with special mechanisms allowing the guests to dine without the presence of servants. In the lower basement, the servants would prepare the table, hoist it to the floor above where waiting guests would sit down to dinner. A diner only needed only to write the name of the dish he desired on a slate and pull the bell next to it. A short time later the chosen dish would appear at the table. Once the meal was over, the table was lowered into the floor, the chairs removed, and the dining room opened into a ballroom.

As you can see in the HDR-picture, craftsmen are laying their final hand on an ongoing renovation. Next day the Hermitage Pavilion was reopened for the public after this renovation.

This is the Hermitage Pavilion (Павильон Эрмитаж) in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia. The pavilion is located in the Gardens at the Catherine Palace. The Hermitage Pavilion was built between 1748 to 1756 by the architect Bartolomeo Rastrelli, under the regime of Empress Elizabeth, the daughter of Peter the Great.  The Hermitage Pavilion proved to be a favourite place for the Empress and her guests. She particularly liked to show it off to foreign ambassadors and other dignitaries.The central hall of the Hermitage was the object of particular fascination for visitors. It contained a table large enough to seat up to 35 guests. What was unique about the dining room table was that it was equipped with special mechanisms allowing the guests to dine without the presence of servants. In the lower basement, the servants would prepare the table, hoist it to the floor above where waiting guests would sit down to dinner. A diner only needed only to write the name of the dish he desired on a slate and pull the bell next to it. A short time later the chosen dish would appear at the table. Once the meal was over, the table was lowered into the floor, the chairs removed, and the dining room opened into a ballroom. Rastrelli was a technical marvel for his time.

 
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Posted by on May 14, 2011 in History, Photo, Pushkin, Saint Petersburg

 

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The Grand Catherine Palace

About 30 minutes, by bus, south of Saint Petersburg lies Pushkin. This city is named after the Russian poet Alexander Pushkin. Before 1937 the city was named Tsarskoye Selo which literary means “The Tsar’s Village”. Here you can visit another architectural masterpiece of Bartolomeo Rastrelli, the Grand Catherine Palace. The palace was originally commissioned by Peter the Great and named after his second wife Catherine. This palace was far more modest than the one standing there now. When Peter’s and Catherine’s daughter Elizabeth become Tsaritsa, she commissioned a new palace to replace to old one, a palace on the scale to rival Versailles. Of course, she hired her favourite architect, Bartolomeo Rastrelli, for this job. The new palace was presented to the Tsaritsa in 1756. It’s 325 meter long and nearly 1 km in circumference, with elaborately decorated blue and white facades featuring gilded atlantes, caryatids and pilasters.

If you’re in Saint Petersburg and have a day over I really recomend a daytrip to Pushkin and the Grand Catherine Palace. You can reach Puskin by train from Vitebsk vokzal (station) or by marshrutka (minibus) from Moskovskaya ploshchad (square).

A couple of HDR-pictures I captured of the Grand Catherine Palace.

This is the Grand Catherine Palace (Большой Екатерининский Дворец)  viewed from the Catherine Park towards the church wing. The palace is located in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia.The palace is named after Catherine I, the wife of Peter the Great, who ruled Russia for two years after her husband's death. Originally a modest two storey building commissioned by Peter for Catherine in 1717, the palace owes its awesome grandeur to their daughter, Empress Elizabeth, who chose Tsarskoe Selo as her chief summer residence. Starting in 1743, the building was reconstructed by four different architects, before Bartholomeo Rastrelli, Chief Architect of the Imperial Court, was instructed to completely redesign the building on a scale to rival Versailles.The brand new palace was presented to the Empress in 1756. It is 325 meter long and nearly 1 km in circumference, with elaborately decorated blue and white facades featuring gilded atlantes, caryatids and pilasters designed by German sculptor Johann Franz Dunker, who also worked with Rastrelli on the palace's original interiors. In Elizabeth's reign it took over 100kg of gold to decorate the palace exteriors, an excess that was deplored by Catherine the Great when she discovered the state and private funds that had been lavished on the building.

A closer view of Catherine Palace (Большой Екатерининский Дворец) in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia.The palace is named after Catherine I, the wife of Peter the Great, who ruled Russia for two years after her husband's death. Originally a modest two storey building commissioned by Peter for Catherine in 1717, the palace owes its awesome grandeur to their daughter, Empress Elizabeth, who chose Tsarskoe Selo as her chief summer residence. Starting in 1743, the building was reconstructed by four different architects, before Bartholomeo Rastrelli, Chief Architect of the Imperial Court, was instructed to completely redesign the building on a scale to rival Versailles.The brand new palace was presented to the Empress in 1756. It is 325 meter long and nearly 1 km in circumference, with elaborately decorated blue and white facades featuring gilded atlantes, caryatids and pilasters designed by German sculptor Johann Franz Dunker, who also worked with Rastrelli on the palace's original interiors. In Elizabeth's reign it took over 100kg of gold to decorate the palace exteriors, an excess that was deplored by Catherine the Great when she discovered the state and private funds that had been lavished on the building.

A closer view of Catherine Palace (Большой Екатерининский Дворец) in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 25 km south of the centre of Saint Petersburg, Russia.The palace is named after Catherine I, the wife of Peter the Great, who ruled Russia for two years after her husband's death. Originally a modest two storey building commissioned by Peter for Catherine in 1717, the palace owes its awesome grandeur to their daughter, Empress Elizabeth, who chose Tsarskoe Selo as her chief summer residence. Starting in 1743, the building was reconstructed by four different architects, before Bartholomeo Rastrelli, Chief Architect of the Imperial Court, was instructed to completely redesign the building on a scale to rival Versailles.The brand new palace was presented to the Empress in 1756. It is 325 meter long and nearly 1 km in circumference, with elaborately decorated blue and white facades featuring gilded atlantes, caryatids and pilasters designed by German sculptor Johann Franz Dunker, who also worked with Rastrelli on the palace's original interiors. In Elizabeth's reign it took over 100kg of gold to decorate the palace exteriors, an excess that was deplored by Catherine the Great when she discovered the state and private funds that had been lavished on the building.

 
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Posted by on May 13, 2011 in History, Photo, Pushkin, Saint Petersburg

 

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