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Fedorovsky town

15 May

I love to photo ruins. They are usually a perfect subject for HDR. A short walk from the Catherine Palace past the Alexander Palace lies Fedorovsky godorok or the Fedorovsky town as you would say in English. Originally this complex of buildings were built as living quarters for the clergy of the Fedorovsky Cathedral that lies just across the nearby pond. There was also a museum of old Russian art and architecture inside the walls of the complex. During the First World War there where a hospital for wounded soldiers and officers here under the patronage of the Tsar Nicholas II’s youngest daughters, Grand Duchess Maria and Anastasia.

The complex suffered severe damage during the German occupation in the Second World War and it was not until the Russian Orthodox Church took over the town in 1994 that a much-needed restoration begun. The restoration is still ongoing but inside the walls there are now the residence of the Patriarch, a museum of history of the Russian Orthodox Church, a pilgrimage and training centre, icon-painting workshops, and a hotel.

On the first HDR-picture you can see the Vicarage that’s still not restored.

A view of the Vicarage at the Fedorovsky godorok (Fedorovsky town).Fedorovsky godorok (Фёдоровский городок) is a complex of buildings in the town of Pushkin, near Saint Petersburg, Russia. Earlier this town was called Tsarskoye Selo, literally ”The Tsar’s Village”.  The town’s name was changed in 1937 to Pushkin to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the death of the Russian poet Alexander Pushkin.At the time of the construction of the Fedorovsky Cathedral it was necessary to build living quarters for the clergy of the cathedral. So it was decided to build an architectural complex in national style on the opposite side of the pond from the cathedral. The Tsar Nicholas II put forward two conditions for this complex to the chosen architect, Stepan Krichinsky . The buildings should be in the same style as the Rostov Kremlin and the complex should not be radically discordant from the nearby Alexander Palace. The construction of the complex started in the summer of 1913 and continued until June 1918.During the construction of the Fedorovsky town, it was suggested by members of the “Society for Renaissance Art of Russia” to open the Museum of Old Russian Art and Architecture here. A large and unique collections of ancient ornaments, weapons, icons, and church plates from the 16th and 17th centuries where quickly gathered here.During the First World War, a hospital for wounded soldiers and officers where opened in the Fedorovsky town and cathedral. The Tsar Nicholas II’s two youngest daughters, Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna, and Anastasia Nikolaevna, become the patronages of the hospital.During the German occupation under the Second World War the Federovsky town was badly damaged. After the war it was suggested to restore the complex, however, it was not carried out. Restoration only began in 1976.In 1994, the complex of the Fedorovsky town was handed over to the Russian Orthodox Church. With the blessing of Patriarch Alexy II there been created inside the walls, the residence of the Patriarch, a museum of history of the Russian Orthodox Church, a pilgrimage and training centre, icon-painting workshops, and a hotel.

On the second HDR-picture you can see the walls and the beautiful White Stone Gate.

A view of a Tower and the White Stonegate of the Fedorovsky godorok (Fedorovsky town).Fedorovsky godorok (Фёдоровский городок) is a complex of buildings in the town of Pushkin, near Saint Petersburg, Russia. Earlier this town was called Tsarskoye Selo, literally ”The Tsar’s Village”.  The town’s name was changed in 1937 to Pushkin to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the death of the Russian poet Alexander Pushkin.At the time of the construction of the Fedorovsky Cathedral it was necessary to build living quarters for the clergy of the cathedral. So it was decided to build an architectural complex in national style on the opposite side of the pond from the cathedral. The Tsar Nicholas II put forward two conditions for this complex to the chosen architect, Stepan Krichinsky . The buildings should be in the same style as the Rostov Kremlin and the complex should not be radically discordant from the nearby Alexander Palace. The construction of the complex started in the summer of 1913 and continued until June 1918.During the construction of the Fedorovsky town, it was suggested by members of the “Society for Renaissance Art of Russia” to open the Museum of Old Russian Art and Architecture here. A large and unique collections of ancient ornaments, weapons, icons, and church plates from the 16th and 17th centuries where quickly gathered here.During the First World War, a hospital for wounded soldiers and officers where opened in the Fedorovsky town and cathedral. The Tsar Nicholas II’s two youngest daughters, Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna, and Anastasia Nikolaevna, become the patronages of the hospital.During the German occupation under the Second World War the Federovsky town was badly damaged. After the war it was suggested to restore the complex, however, it was not carried out. Restoration only began in 1976.In 1994, the complex of the Fedorovsky town was handed over to the Russian Orthodox Church. With the blessing of Patriarch Alexy II there been created inside the walls, the residence of the Patriarch, a museum of history of the Russian Orthodox Church, a pilgrimage and training centre, icon-painting workshops, and a hotel.

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Posted by on May 15, 2011 in History, Photo, Pushkin, Saint Petersburg

 

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