RSS

The Winter Palace

12 May

I haven’t abandoned this blog but I need to post more frequently!

Talking about Saint Petersburg, the most well known building in Piter is without doubt the Winter Palace. This was the official residence of Russian Tsars from 1732 until the last of them, Nicholas II, abdicated in 1917. The majestic palace we today view from the Palace square is the fourth Winter Palace built. The first Winter Palace was, unlike the present version, a modest building of two main floors under a slate roof. As Piter grew the Winter Palace was replaced by bigger and more splendid versions. The present version, built in Elizabethan Baroque style, is designed by Bartolomeo Rastrelli and was originally commissioned by Tsaritsa Anna. But during the reign of Tsaritsa Elizabeth the original plan was changed and a new scheme to build a colossal Winter Palace was adopted. However, Rastrelli did not complete the Place before Elizabeth’s death. So it was only Tsaritsa Catherine the Great and her successors who could enjoy the magnificent Palace as their residence. Today the Winter Palace houses the Hermitage Museum, one of the largest and most respected art museums in the world.

This HDR-picture of the Winter Palace towards Dvortsovaya Naberezhnaya is captured just before sunset. Beautiful colours aren’t they?

A capture of the Winter Palace in Saint Petersburg, Russia, at sunset. The Winter Palace (Зимний дворец) was the official residence of the Russian Tsars from 1732 to 1917. The palace was constructed on a monumental scale that was intended to reflect the might and power of Imperial Russia. It was designed by many architects, most notably Bartolomeo Rastrelli, in what came to be known as the Elizabethan Baroque style.The Winter Palace was built between 1754 and 1762 for Empress Elizabeth, the daughter of Peter the Great. Unfortunately, Elizabeth died before the palace’s completion and only Catherine the Great and her successors were able to enjoy the sumptuous interiors of Elizabeth’s home. Many of the palace’s impressive interiors have been remodelled since then, particularly after 1837, when a huge fire destroyed most of the building. Today the Winter Palace, together with four more buildings arranged side by side along the river embankment, houses the extensive collections of the Hermitage. The Hermitage Museum is the largest art gallery in Russia and is among the largest and most respected art museums in the world.

And a view from the Palace square.

A capture of the Winter Palace in Saint Petersburg, Russia, at sunset. The Winter Palace (Зимний дворец) was the official residence of the Russian Tsars from 1732 to 1917. The palace was constructed on a monumental scale that was intended to reflect the might and power of Imperial Russia. It was designed by many architects, most notably Bartolomeo Rastrelli, in what came to be known as the Elizabethan Baroque style.The Winter Palace was built between 1754 and 1762 for Empress Elizabeth, the daughter of Peter the Great. Unfortunately, Elizabeth died before the palace’s completion and only Catherine the Great and her successors were able to enjoy the sumptuous interiors of Elizabeth’s home. Many of the palace’s impressive interiors have been remodelled since then, particularly after 1837, when a huge fire destroyed most of the building. Today the Winter Palace, together with four more buildings arranged side by side along the river embankment, houses the extensive collections of the Hermitage. The Hermitage Museum is the largest art gallery in Russia and is among the largest and most respected art museums in the world.

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 12, 2011 in History, Photo, Saint Petersburg

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: